The Foundation of Fear

by:  Gio Lopez

Alright I’ll admit it: I don’t fully trust God with my future.  Phew, what a relief to get that off my chest.

 

It’s strange – though the vast majority of Christians I’ve ever met in life can empathize with fearing the future, I have found it rare for people to admit the root of their fears: a lack of faith. Among Christians it seems confessions of fear are more prevalent than confessions of doubt. Maybe it’s because we don’t take the time and effort to discern the root of why we hold onto certain fears in our lives. Or perhaps it’s because in some bizarre way fear looks better than doubt; admitting fear makes us appear as victims while admitting doubt just makes us look like bad Christians.

 

 

Either way, the trend has always bothered me. If we are unwilling to dig deeper to the core of our fears and confess our lack of faith, then how can we allow God to work in us? How can we accept God’s healing when we refuse to admit that we’re wounded?

 

In my own life, healing starts when I admit that I don’t fully trust God with my calling as a pastor. I doubt that God can truly provide for and prepare me. I doubt God when He calls me worthy and loved despite my shortcomings.

 

How can we accept God’s healing when we refuse to admit that we’re wounded?

 

But thank God that as soon as I recognize my lack of trust and faith, I allow God to speak truth to me. Recently, after coming to God in prayer about my doubts and fears for the future, God answered me through His word. During my quiet time, I came across the story of Naaman in 2 Kings chapter 5. Naaman was a commander with leprosy who came to the prophet Elisha for healing. When Elisha told him to wash himself in the Jordan seven times to be healed, Naaman went away angry because he doubted God could heal him with just a few dips in the river. Nonetheless, Naaman went ahead and gave it a try and after being healed declared, “Now I know that there is no God in all the world except in Israel” (2 Kings 5:15).

 

I serve the God who is infinitely stronger and bigger than the doubts and shortcomings I have

 
While reading it was difficult to not identify myself with Naaman. God was clearly reminding me that He was sufficient for me. Like Naaman, I doubt God’s capability to work in my life because I rely on my own flawed and limited view of God’s power. But praise God I serve the God who is infinitely stronger and bigger than the doubts and shortcomings I have. Daily, I will honestly confess of my need for God, fight against my doubts, cling to the truth that my God is good and my God is able, and, at the end of the day, declare, like Naaman, of God’s grace and power to anyone willing to listen.
 

Have you not known? Have you not heard? The LORD is the everlasting God, the Creator of the ends of the earth. He does not faint or grow weary; his understanding is unsearchable. He gives power to the faint, and to him who has no might he increases strength. – Isaiah 40:28-29

About The Author
Gio Lopez is an intern at GSBC and a leader in the worship and student ministries. He is also a student at The College at Southeastern studying Pastoral Ministry where he seeks to be known for his love of Jesus and people. His hobbies include admiring good dogs, playing worship music, and taking long walks around the kitchen.